Reuters has reported new instances of avian influenza detected among wild birds in western China, according to announcements from the country's agriculture ministry.
H5N1 bird flu was circulating in dairy cows for four months before it was detected, USDA scientists say
Cynthia Goldsmith/CDC

Reuters has reported new instances of avian influenza detected among wild birds in western China, according to announcements from the country’s agriculture ministry. The growing alarm over an American outbreak potentially affecting cattle underscores the situation’s seriousness.

In Qinghai province, health officials have documented 275 cases of H5 influenza among deceased Pallas’s gulls and other wild avian species, as per the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs. These findings, reported by the China Animal Disease Control Center, were confirmed by the national Avian Influenza Reference Laboratory.

Meanwhile, in the United States, an H5N1 influenza outbreak has emerged in dairy cattle across nine states since late March, prompting concerns about possible transmission to humans. However, no human cases have been confirmed.

In response to the escalating situation, the US government on May 11 committed approximately $200 million to combat the spread of the disease.

Additionally, the announcement of the avian influenza cases in China coincided with the country’s anti-corruption agency initiating an investigation into the agriculture minister.

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As the U.S. dairy industry confronts a bird flu outbreak, with cases reported at dozens of farms and the disease spreading to people, the egg industry could serve as an example of how to slow the disease but also shows how difficult it can be to eradicate the virus.

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